1
0

Kundvagn

Just nu finns det inga artiklar i kundvagnen.


    Oral health and
    the connected body

     

    Philips oral healthcare symposium

    Philips hosts annual oral health symposiums to discuss and celebrate new research in the area of oral healthcare. Previous symposiums took place in California and Berlin, and were attended by key opinion leaders from around the world.


    Click on one of the experts below to watch a short clip from their presentation.

    Marko de Jager, PhD - A connected future

    Marko de Jager
    Philips is pursuing a novel approach to the continuum of patient
    care by focusing on how oral and systemic health can effectively
    support healthy lifestyle choices in a ‘connected future’. Philips Oral
    Healthcare is working with dental and medical professionals to
    address the oral care and lifestyle needs of their patients and help
    improve patient treatment outcomes. To learn more about how
    Philips initiates and contributes to health and well-being through
    meaningful innovation, watch this video of Dr. Marko de Jager from
    Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.


    Watch the full video

    Steven Offenbacher, DDS, PhD, M.Msc - Adverse pregnancy outcomes

    Steven Offenbacher
    Increased incidence of low birth weight, preterm birth and preeclampsia have been associated with maternal periodontitis exposure¹. However, the strength of the observed associations is modest and seems to vary according to the population studied the means of periodontal assessment and the periodontal disease classification employed². To learn more about the relationship between periodontitis and pregnancy, watch this video of Dr. Steven Offenbacher from Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.

    Watch the full video

    Bruno Loos, DDS, MS, PhD - Cardiovascular disease

    Bruno Loos

    Periodontitis may be associated with an increased risk of development of cardiovascular disease³ ⁴ ⁵. There are several theories about potential mechanisms, including bacteria entering the bloodstream through the mouth and attaching to fatty deposits in the lining of blood vessels, which may contribute to heart
    disease⁶. Another theory is that inflammation associated with periodontitis may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis⁷. To learn more about the potential relationships between periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, watch this video of Dr. Bruno Loos from Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.

     

    Watch the full video

    Frank Scannapieco, PhD, DMD - Pulmonary disease

    Frank Scannapieco
    Poor oral health appears to influence the initiation and/or progression of several pulmonary diseases, including pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This presentation will provide an overview of the latest information on the connections between poor oral health and aspiration pneumonia, nosocomial-acquired pneumonia, especially ventilatorassociated pneumonia (VAP) and COPD. See what practical advice Frank Scannapiecs has on how to translate findings into everyday practice in this short clip from his presentation at the Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.

    Watch the full video

    Evanthia Lalla, DDS, MS - Diabetes

    Evanthia Lalla
    Patients with uncontrolled diabetes have complications such as increased risk of periodontitis. Periodontitis is associated with an increased risk of developing type II diabetes and may be considered one of the chronic complications of diabetes in general. Periodontitis may also impact the ability to control blood glucose levels in individuals with diabetes⁸ ⁹. To learn more about the relationship between periodontitis and diabetes, watch this video of Dr. Evanthia (Evie) Lalla from Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.

    Watch the full video

    Souvik Sen, MD, MPH - Stroke

    Sen Souvik
    Atherosclerosis of cerebral vessels and its consequences resulting in ischaemic stroke are the most frequent cause of acute strokes. Periodontitis and the resulting inflammation as a source of chronic and acute infections in distal organs and tissues may be a risk factor of atherosclerotic vascular processes⁷ ¹⁰. The presence of chronic destructive inflammation in the mouth may contribute to the dissemination of bacteria, their virulent factors, various proinflammatory cells, cytokines and immunologically active substances into the blood stream⁷. To learn more about the relationship between periodontitis and stroke, watch this video of Dr. Souvik Sen from Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.

    Watch the full video

    Brian Novy, DDS, FADI - High Fructose Corn Syrup

    Brian Novy
    While media blitzes lead the general public to believe that the body makes no distinction between ingesting high fructose corn syrup or sucrose, the differences between these two sweeteners suggest otherwise. From metabolism to involvement in the caries process, high fructose corn syrup sets in motion a cascade of events beginning in the mouth, and ending in the heart. To find out more about the effects of HFCS, watch this short clip from Brian Novy’s presentation at the Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.

    Watch the full video

    Betsy Reynolds, RDH, MS - High Fructose Corn Syrup

    Betsy Reynolds
    While media blitzes lead the general public to believe that the body
    makes no distinction between ingesting high fructose corn syrup or
    sucrose, the differences between these two sweeteners suggest
    otherwise. From metabolism to involvement in the caries process,
    high fructose corn syrup sets in motion a cascade of events
    beginning in the mouth, and ending in the heart. To find out more
    about the effects of HFCS, watch this short clip from Betsy Reynolds’
    presentation at the Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected
    Body Symposium.


    Watch the full video

    Maria Goldie, RDH, BA, MS - Women’s health

    Maria Goldie
    Women and men have differing healthcare needs, according to research in sex-based medicine. Women have unique needs from puberty through menopause. Oral healthcare professionals need to make balanced, evidence-based decisions regarding management of their female patients. Treatment protocols appropriate for each phase of a women’s life cycle should be considered. To learn more about sex-based considerations, watch this video of Maria Goldie from Philips’ 2014 Oral Health and the Connected Body Symposium.

    Watch the full video

    References


    1. Lopez E, Raymond J, Patkai J, et al. Capnocytophaga species and preterm birth: Case series and review of the literature. Clin Microbiol
       Infect 2010; 16: 1539-1543.
    2. Madianos PN, Bobetsis YA, Offenbacher S. Adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) and periodontal disease: Pathogenic mechanisms. J
        Clin Periodontol 2013; 40 (suppl 14): S170-S180.
    3. Humphrey LL, Fu R, Buckley D, Freeman M, Helfand M. Periodontal disease and coronary heart disease incidence: A systematic review
        and meta-analysis. J Gen Intern Med 2008; 23: 2079-2086.
    4. Hujoel PP, Dransholt M, Spiekerman C, DeRouen TA. Periodontal disease and coronary heart disease risk. JAMA 2000; 284: 1406-1410.
    5. Janket SJ, Baird AE, Chuang SK, Jones JA. Meta-analysis of periodontal disease and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Oral
        Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2003; 95: 559-569.
    6. Koren O, Spor A, Felin J, et al. Human oral, gut, and plaque microbiota in  patients with atherosclerosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2011; 108:
        4592-4598.            
    7. Schenkein HA, Loos BG. Inflammatory mechanisms linking periodontal  diseases to cardiovascular diseases. J Clin Periodontol 2013; 40
        (suppl 14): S51-S69.
    8. Engebretson S, Kocher T. Evidence that periodontal treatment improves  diabetes outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. J
        Clin Periodontol 2013; 40 (suppl 14): S153-S163.
    9. Taylor JJ, Preshaw PM, Lalla E. A review of the evidence for pathogenic mechanisms that may link periodontitis and diabetes. J Clin
        Periodontol 2013: 40 (suppl 14): S113-S134.
    10. Sen S, Sumner R, Hardin J, Barros S, Moss K, Beck J, Offenbacher S. Periodontal disease and recurrent vascular events in stroke/
        transient ischemic attack patients. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Di. 2013; 22 (8): 1420-1427.